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Job postings rise as market rebounds

Tuesday, 5 October 2010 | By Oliver Milman

The Australian job market is showing encouraging signs of recovery, according to a new report, with healthy increases in advertised full-time and part-time positions.

 

 

The latest Advantage job index has revealed that there was a 3.2% increase in job ads in September. The index was compiled by analysing 214,938 positions vacant ads on the three leading job listings portals.

 

The rise in part-time working is illustrated in the index, with a 3.4% increase in job ads. Full-time positions posted a 3.2% increase, while contract and temporary roles experienced a 1.8% rise.

 

Healthcare was the most improved sector in terms of job postings, rising 7.2%. Accounting increased by 6.5%, IT rose 5.5% and hospitality and tourism upped by 5%.

 

Conversely, there was an 8.3% decline in education job postings, a 5.4% decrease in advertising and media and a 2.9% dip in human resources.

 

Queensland was the best performing state, with a 3.9% rise in job postings. NSW was second with a 3.6% increase, with Victoria up by 3.3%.

 

Separate research by ANZ supports the trend of rising job postings, claiming that total job advertisements on the internet and in newspapers increased by 0.7% in September, up 32.9% on the same month last year.

 

“The job market is going from strength to strength and, with the election behind us and a growing economy, this trend looks set to continue,” says Bob Olivier, director of global market intelligence at Advantage Resourcing.

“In times of growth, employees are more willing to commit to full-time employees rather than hedge their bets in a slowing or uncertain economy by hiring contract or temporary staff or freeze hiring altogether.”

 

“As rates go up, employees expect fuller pay packets to keep pace with CPI and with more jobs available they have increased bargaining powers. On the flip side, the prospect of rate rises can cloud employee hiring decisions as they take a wait and see approach.”