Five tech tools for smart soloists

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features-solo-tools-thumbOperating as a soloist can mean working long and irregular hours, as well as in remote locations. With no one else to count on, sole traders need to have a handy set of tech tools to fall back on.

 

But where do you start? For example, is the new battle in mini tablets something you should be investigating? What smart apps should you be using? What devices will boost productivity?

 

StartupSmart spoke to a couple of tech industry experts to find out exactly what you need in your tech toolbox:

 

 

1. Cloud-based software

 

“Start-ups should be looking to run their business using software in the cloud so they have the freedom to access at any time, from anywhere with an internet connection,” says Adam Franklin, marketing manager of web strategy firm Bluewire Media.

 

“It is very compatible with the ‘lifestyle’ solopreneurs are after. Plus the costs are drastically reduced by using cloud software.”

 

Franklin’s favourite tools include Saasu (cloud accounting software), Highrise (customer relationship management), Google Docs (for Word processing and spreadsheets) and Google Analytics (for tracking).

 

Another favourite is Sprout, which, according to Franklin, is a great tool for managing all your social media profiles.

 

 

2. Mini tablets

 

According to Fred Schebesta, founder of Finder.com.au, you should only invest in a mini tablet if you’re always on the go.

 

“A key feature about tablets is that they are highly portable and you can easily take some business documents with you,” Schebesta says.

 

“Owners should be able to increase productivity while on the go. This may include checking large files or connecting to online apps such as Skype to communicate with clients.”

 

If you do intend to invest in a tablet, or any other mobile gadget, you need to ensure it is 4G-capable, Schebesta says.

 

“With some networks introducing 4G, the iPad mini can instantly stream videos, photos and audio wirelessly,” he says.

 

“If the tablet can’t access the programs you use in the office, it is not worth investing in. For instance, our team uses Google Docs and they can simply access the documents on a mobile device.”

 

“Research what apps are available that will help you improve productivity before investing in it.”

 

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