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Wireless charging and energy harvesting set to lead tech trends: Report

Wednesday, 5 October 2011 | By Michelle Hammond
Business research firm Frost & Sullivan has unveiled the top 50 technologies and innovations set to impact on business throughout the decade, including wireless charging and energy harvesting.

 

The TechVision 2020 report is an annual research initiative conducted by the firm’s technical insights team, whose objective is to identify future technologies that will impact business.

 

Frost & Sullivan partner Rajiv Kumar says the team collated information on emerging and disruptive technologies, and conducted interviews with innovators and developers.

 

“Each technology is then rated and compared across many parameters such as global R&D footprint, year of impact, global IP patenting activity, private and government funding, current and emerging applications, and current and potential adoption rate,” Kumar says.

 

“Finally the list was condensed to the top 50 technologies which we believe have the maximum potential for wide-scale launch and mass commercialisation.”

 

The selected technologies are divided into nine categories, including the Clean & Green Technology category.

 

According to the report one of the hottest trends in this category is the advancement in battery technologies for renewable electricity storage and electric vehicle batteries.

 

This advancement is intended to increase the adoption of zero-emission power generation and automobiles.

 

The need for increasing mobility has given rise to technologies in the Microelectronics and Information and Communication Technology categories, namely wireless charging and cloud computing.

 

“With wireless charging consumers will no longer have to depend on wired chargers to juice up their mobile phones, tablets and cameras,” Kumar says.

 

“The technology involves a metal plate which will charge the device wirelessly and will be deployed in public places such as airports, cafés and restaurants.”


In the Life Sciences and Biotechnology category one of the major trends is personal genome sequencing, whereby each individual will have their own DNA sequence analysed and medical treatment will be personalised.

 

Future applications will include the best cosmetics to use, the type of food that will provide best nutrition and which environmental triggers to avoid.

 

“The vast arrays of current and future applications of these dynamic technologies are interdependent and overlapping,” the report states.

 

“These technologies are rapidly evolving and form a vortex of innovation, driving new concepts, products and services.”


In other news, Australian tech start-up NLYZR is running a competition for a $50,000 website optimisation makeover in addition to free SEO services for every entrant.

 

According to NLYZR founder Craig Wilson, the competition is to being run to celebrate the launch of the company’s SEO system.

 

“The first and most essential challenge for any business wanting to compete online is to be easily found in search for relevant search terms,” Wilson says.

 

“This alone can make an incredible difference to your business.”