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I feel intimidated by clients. Help!

Friday, 23 September 2011 | By Debra Templar
I've had a few meeting with potential clients and I seem to get quite intimidated by them. They all work for huge companies and I've only just started out. How can I get over this and sell my product effectively to them?

 

As a new business, you will soon appreciate the need for “confidence builders”.

 

The people you are seeing may voice their fears by saying, "Where are these in use?”, “We have to be assured of continuity of supplies..." or "I am not opening any new accounts".

 

To overcome these fears of being let down on deliveries, of quality not being up to samples submitted, of costly replacements, the sales offer must include confidence-building sentences based on business analysis:

 

“Our business has been established for six months but for 20 years I was chief scientist of the largest XYZ firm in Australia.  It was the vast experience I gained there that has developed..."

 

“We are only a small company, Mr Smith, but we are local. That means that you will get prompt and personal service, not only from me but from all our technical team...”

 

“Because we are fairly small we operate only in a limited area. This keeps our costs down and we can pass the benefit onto you.”

Remember that telling isn’t selling.

 

Factual statements such as:

 

  • It will increase your profit;
  • It will do a marvellous job;
  • We can deliver them immediately;
  • Our service is first-class;
  • They are sold all over Australia;

 

…are just some of the superlatives that sound fine to a salesperson but factual statements don't personalise a benefit and it is personal benefits which motivate a buyer.

 

You, therefore, need a constant reminder to explain benefits in terms of the buyers' interests.

 

You will never forget to personalise benefits if you remember these three link words: “which means that”.

 

“They are sold all over Australia” is a confidence-building sentence used by many salespeople. By adding the words “which means that”, it can be considerably strengthened.

 

“They are sold all over Australia which means that your agents can get immediate service.”

 

“We maintain huge stocks”. What does this mean? How huge are the stocks? The word huge can be interpreted differently by different people.

 

“We maintain huge stocks which means that we can almost take over your inventory problems, and like some of our other customers, you will cut down on stocks by 30% or more because we deliver so quickly...”

 

By using the words “which means that” you will be certain to give the “benefit you appeal”. The “you” is, of course, the buyer. Every sale must have “you” appeal.

 

Believe in yourself. Believe in your business. Believe in your product. Do your homework.

 

Learn the features and benefits, not only of your product, but of your business too.